Golden Gate Photo - Yellowstone Gallery - Page 2
Fine Art Photography from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.


Grand Prismatic Spring

Grand Prismatic Spring

At 250 feet (75 meters) by 300 feet (90 meters), Grand Prismatic Spring, located in the Midway Geyser Basin, is the largest hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, and the third largest in the world, after two larger ones in New Zealand. It's 160oF (70 oC) and up to 160 feet (50 meters) deep. The brilliant colors are the result of thermophilic cyanobacteria growing in the near-boiling waters. In the foreground, those are the hoof prints of bison that have visited the area. In the background is evidence of the forest fires that ravaged the park back in 1988.

Print No. A01NW-38-4

Old Faithful

Old Faithful Geyser

The famous Old Faithful Geyser is located in the Upper Geyser Basin Area. This is one of the most recognized natural landmarks in the country. As of September 2001, it was erupting once approximately every 70 minutes, lasting a few minutes. Here is a time sequence of one eruption (488 Kb).

Print No. A01NW-40-5

Castle Geyser

Castle Geyser

Castle Geyser is located in the Upper Geyser Basin, just northwest of Old Faithful. As of September 2001, it was erupting once about every 9 to 11 hours. Although it does not erupt nearly as frequently as Old Faithful, the eruptions are more impressive, with a gushing water phase of about 20 minutes followed by a steam phase for about another 40 minutes. To the left of the geyser, you can see a minor vent also erupting.

Print No. A01NW-38-12

Pearl Geyser

Pearl Geyser

Pearl Geyser is located in the Norris Geyser Area, the oldest, hottest, and most acidic thermal area in Yellowstone. This geyser erupts infrequently, with water reaching up to 8 feet (2.4 meters) high. Earthquakes occur in this area, which lies at the intersection of three major faults. One result of these frequent earthquakes is that the geysers here are more unpredictable, changing their behavior from explosive to dormant or the other way around.

Print No. A01NW-29-10

Spasm Geyser, Clepsydra Geyser, and Brocken Specter

Spasm Geyser, Clepsydra Geyser, and Brocken Specter

The steam produced in the Lower Geyser Basin reflects the early morning Sun, resulting in a halo centered around the shadow of the camera (positioned in front of my head). The result is called a Brocken specter (AKA specter, or spectre of the Brocken). Spasm Geyser is in the foreground. Clepsydra Geyser is the one in the middle left producing the most steam.

Print No. A01NW-37-1

More images of haloes.

New Blue Spring

New Blue Spring

New Blue Spring is a part of the Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces. The terraces are deposits of travertine (calcium carbonate). The travertine originates from the strata of limestone below this area. Groundwater comes into contact with hot gases containing carbon dioxide to form a weak carbonic acid. This solution dissolves the ancient limestone and rises to the surface as hot springs. Once exposed to the atmosphere, the carbon dioxide escapes and the travertine is deposited.

Print No. A01NW-30-8

Orange Spring Mound

Orange Spring Mound

Orange Spring Mound is located in the upper part of the Mammoth Terraces. The streaks of color on the mound are due to the growth of thermophilic bacteria in the hot water. The large mound is the result of very slow water flow through several vents near its top, gradually building up the mound.

Print No. A01NW-30-9

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