Golden Gate Photo - Tuolumne Meadows and Vicinity Gallery - Part 1
Fine Art Photography from Tuolumne Meadows and the surrounding Highlands of Yosemite National Park.


Tuolumne Meadows was named by the Whitney Survey, and comes from the Native American tribe Taulamne that lived on the banks of the lower Tuolumne and Stanislaus rivers. At a base elevation of 8,600 feet (2,622 meters), Tuolumne Meadows is the largest subalpine meadow in the Sierra. Truly a spectacular landscape of contrasting barren granodiorite domes and glacially-sculpted arÍtes and forested ponds. It is also the beginning and ending point of the High Sierra Camp Loop.

Soda Springs, Tuolumne Meadows

Soda Springs, Tuolumne Meadows

Forced back to the surface by the pressure of groundwater seeping into the higher granitic peaks, these springs casually bubble out onto the Tuolumne Meadows and get their name from the mineralized water which is mildly carbonated.

Print No. A98-37-9

Here is a close-up of the bubbling action in this photo

Lembert Dome

Lembert Dome

Lembert Dome rises above the east side of Tuolumne Meadows. It is a classic granodiorite dome, carved by glacial activity. The arÍtes of Unicorn Peak are seen in the distance, across Tuolumne Meadows.

Print No. A02-36-3

Dog Lake

Dog Lake

Dog Lake is located in the northeast portion of Tuolumne Meadows, just north of Lembert Dome. Looking east from here, the high point in the distance is Mount Dana at 13,053 feet (3,979 meters), the second highest peak in Yosemite National Park.

Print No. A02-36-1

Elizabeth Lake Reflection

Elizabeth Lake Reflection

Elizabeth Lake is an alpine lake and lies just south of Tuolumne Meadows. The arÍtes of Unicorn Peak in the Cathedral Range are reflected in the lake shortly after sunrise.

Print No. A02-23-9

Loch and Lode

Loch and Lode

Northeast of Tuolumne Meadows, and just west of Tioga Pass, the granitic rocks which dominate most of Yosemite National Park give way to older overlying metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. As the granitic magma intruded into the overlying rocks, chemical reactions resulted in the deposition of various minerals, most notably precious metals. Along this contact, mine shafts were excavated looking for silver. The Great Sierra Mine site is located along the top of the ridgeline behind the lake. Some of the mine shafts are still present, as are the remnants of a few stone buildings from the city of Dana. Gaylor Peak is just right of center. The pointy peak on the left is Mount Dana, on the east side of Tioga Pass.

Print No. A02-31-5

Granite Lakes

Granite Lakes

Just southwest of the Great Sierra Mine are the Granite Lakes, two lakes formed within a glacial cirque. The peak with the most snow in front of it (just right of center) is Mount Lyell. At 13,114 feet (3,997 meters) it is the highest peak in Yosemite National Park.

Print No. A02-31-7

Page 1 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery
Page 2 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - YOSEMITE IN WINTER
Page 4 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - TUOLUMNE MEADOWS AND VICINITY, PART 2
Page 5 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - ASSORTED IMAGES OF HALF DOME
Page 6 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - THE TRIP TO HALF DOME SUMMIT
Page 7 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - THE TRIP TO MOUNT DANA SUMMIT
Page 8 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - WATERFALLS OF YOSEMITE
Page 9 of the Yosemite National Park Gallery - HIGH SIERRA CAMPS
BACK TO CALIFORNIA GALLERY   BACK TO WESTERN U.S. GALLERY   BACK TO MAIN GALLERY


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